Scrapping ban on patient testimonials would give free rein to cosmetic ‘cowboys’, medical experts warn



“I’m really worried about the impact this will have on patient safety,” she said. “You will never see a bad testimonial on a platform that a doctor controls.”

Faux said neither AHPRA nor the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission was making a concerted effort to pursue doctors who breached the rules. Influencers who profited from promoting cosmetic surgery should also be held to account, she said.

“It’s income-generating for them and potentially puts vulnerable young people at risk, usually women, who look up to these influencers as role models,” she said.

The Health Practitioner Regulation National Law and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2022 is currently before the Queensland parliament – the host jurisdiction for the national law, which governs more than 800,000 medical professionals across Australia.

A committee of the Queensland parliament is considering the bill and will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, with a report due next month. If the amendments were passed, they would apply automatically in states and territories except for NSW, South Australia and Western Australia, which must take additional steps to adopt them.

NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said he had instructed his department to “look closely” at the legislation and consider the impact on patients of lifting the ban.

“You will never see a bad testimonial on a platform that a doctor controls.”

Health regulation consultant Dr Margaret Faux

“Clearly, we need to consult with the medical community,” he said.

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath said the bill “would see testimonials treated the same as other forms of advertising” and, consistent with general consumer law, they must not be false, misleading or deceptive.

Testimonials would be prohibited if they were provided in exchange for gifts or inducements without stating the terms and conditions, created an unreasonable expectation of beneficial treatment, or encouraged the unnecessary use of regulated health services.

Loading

Australian Medical Association president Dr Omar Khorshid said patient testimonials were impossible to verify and could be “completely misleading”.

“It’s not a reasonable way to measure the quality of medical practice,” Khorshid said.

He said it was “bizarre” that health ministers were moving to end the ban while the AHPRA’s review of the standards in cosmetic surgery was underway.

Khorshid said the changes would give free rein to “cosmetic cowboys who’ve been promoting themselves in ways that we believe are unethical and practising in ways that we believe are below the standards”.

Loading

Dr Naveen Somia, the past president of the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, said while there might be a role for testimonials, any change was premature while the inquiry was underway.

Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgery and Medicine president Dr Patrick Tansley said the college did not support testimonials as they were often paid for, might not be accurate, and could not be verified.

“Patients should be very, very careful about placing any weight on them whatsoever,” he said.

Loading

Macquarie University’s head of plastic surgery, professor Anand Deva, said in a submission to the Queensland parliamentary hearing that misleading testimonials were associated with serious risk of harm and complications, especially in commercially driven areas of medicine such as cosmetic surgery.

“There is no way of policing whether or not the use of testimonials in medical advertising is
compliant with AHPRA advertising standards,” he said. “Failure to enforce these standards will only embolden the use of testimonials as a marketing and advertising tool rather than one that provides factual information to patients seeking a particular treatment.”

Deva said social media influencers were being used as “surrogate testimonials” to get around the ban, in a trend that AHPRA is examining as part of its review.

“We need to ensure that we hold the highest standards and protect patients from both misinformation and unscrupulous and undertrained practitioners,” he said, calling for the ban to remain in place at least until AHPRA handed down its findings.

Cut through the noise of federal politics with news, views and expert analysis from Jacqueline Maley. Subscribers can sign up to our weekly Inside Politics newsletter here.



Source link

Denial of responsibility! insideheadline is an automatic aggregator around the global media. All the content are available free on Internet. We have just arranged it in one platform for educational purpose only. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials on our website, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.